AWS buys $9.2m worth of Swedish land for future data centres




Reports are circulating that Amazon Web Services has purchased more land in Sweden to build additional data centres, just days after announcing the opening of their new cloud region in Stockholm.

AWS bought 2,260,421 sq ft of land for $5.8m in Katrineholm, and an additional 1,323,960 sq ft of land for $3.4m in Eskilstuna, according to Swedish real estate magazine Fastighetsvärlden.

Andy Jassy, CEO of AWS said: “An AWS Region in Stockholm enables Swedish and Nordic customers, with local latency or data sovereignty requirements, to move the rest of their applications to AWS and enjoy cost and agility advantages across their entire application portfolio.”

In addition the company has acquired the amazon.se domain, as well made an agreement with local logistics company Postnord. AWS launched a new cloud region in Stockholm, Sweden, and now provides 60 availability zones across 20 infrastructure regions globally, serving customers in over 190 countries.

AWS Europe Stockholm region is the company’s fifth in Europe, joining existing regions in France, Germany, Ireland, and the UK. Rapid digitalisation and the increasing rate of cloud deployment are two additional factors that have put Sweden in the spotlight for data centres and international investors.

According to figures presented by AWS, by relying on fewer servers and the superior efficiency of large-scale cloud infrastructure, cloud customers require just 16% of the power typically consumed by on premise data centres.

According to a recent report published by the Nordic Council of Ministers, the Nordic data centre construction market is estimated to attract annual investments of $2.2-4.9bn by 2025 which corresponds to an installed annual capacity of 280-580 MW per year.

The Nordic region is well connected to the UK, continental Europe, and the US, and new major fibre optic installations linking the Nordics to North America and Asia are being deployed or planned.

Data Economy contacted AWS regarding the new Swedish land bought, but they are yet to respond.